Using the Polar H10 and A360/370 for Recovery Training

Yesterday, I reviewed the Morpheus Recovery Band. Today, I’ll talk about a suite of Polar devices/apps.

I’ve been using the Polar H10 chest strap the longest, both for morning heart rate variability (HRV) readings and for tracking exercise. I started using the Polar A360 in October for wrist-based heart rate tracking. The A360 isn’t made anymore, but the A370 is very similar and has nice new features like all-day heart rate monitoring and GPS. Then I also need two free apps: Polar Beat (for the H10) and Polar Flow (for the A360 and bringing all the data together). I know it sounds kinda clunky, but in practice, it’s pretty simple. Here’s how I use this.

Goals

My current goal is to recondition after a long illness. One of the problems with adrenal fatigue is that if you overdo physical or emotional stress, you can knock your recovery back days or weeks. It took me a year to figure out that 20 minutes of gardening, sweeping the deck, or moderate exercises like a few pushups and situps constituted “entirely too much exercise.” I would wake up feeling good, overdo it, and get knocked back to the couch for several days. It was incredibly frustrating because I rarely felt good two days in a row. For, like, two years.

So I wanted a way to quantify how much work I was doing and have some data to help me understand how much was too much. The key data I needed were my morning heart rate variability (HRV) scores, and some way to measure how much energy I was actually expending not just during workouts, but during daily activities, chores, walking to meetings, etc.

Polar H10

For HRV

I’ve already talked about measuring my HRV. I largely did that with the H10, though Welltory also let me measure it with my finger on my phone. (I ended up abandoning Welltory – it seemed less accurate over time and didn’t give me much uniquely useful info.)

For exercise tracking

  • Use with the Polar Beats app. Start the app, tell it what kind of exercise you are doing, and press “Start.”
  • If you leave the app open, you can see your heart rate moment-to-moment.
  • Five “zones” are color-coded from 1-5 based on your maximum recommended heart rate (220 minus your age).
    • For me, Zone 1 (50-60% of max HR) is 88-105 bpm because my max HR should be 176.
    • Zone 5 is 90-100% of your max (158+ for me), and I avoid it like the plague at this stage of my reconditioning.
  • Building on what I learned from the Morpheus band, Polar Zones 1-3 are recovery, Zone 4 is conditioning, and Zone 5 is overreaching. In practice, I am a little lower – I think my conditioning zone probably starts around 130 bmp, which is 75% max or “Zone 2.5” and I don’t like to go above 150/Zone 3.5/85% max right now.

Polar A360/370

polar-a370-white-600x600The 360 and 370 work basically the same way. You can use them as a wrist-based HR tracker for exercise, though it is not sensitive enough to track HRV (use the H10 for that). It is supposedly very accurate for walking and jogging, but less good for weightlifting and cycling. It also has an all-day activity monitor, and a sleep monitoring feature I’ve not used much at all.

The reason I got it is because I wanted to see my HR during exercise on my wrist, not my phone – I often use my phone to play workout videos and can’t see both apps at once. I also wanted to be able to track exercise on the fly during the day – e.g., walking to a meeting, or giving a presentation – because I suspected that many of my daily activities were more strenuous than I’d realized. It works great for this – I can see the same fitness zones on my wrist that I had been getting from the H10, and I regularly set it to record my activity while I’m at work.

You track day-long activity on the Polar Flow app. This will also take in info from Polar Beats, so if you do use the H10 for certain exercises, all the data gets collected into one place and count toward your daily activity. What’s slightly confusing is that “activity” is broken into different “zones” than training. Here’s a table…

Polar Training Zone

Morpheus Recovery Zone

HR range (BPM are for age 44)

Polar Flow Activity Level

0

Total rest

<88bpm

·        Resting + sitting

1

Recovery

50-60% max

88-104bpm

·        Low

2

Recovery

60-70% max
105-122

·      Low-Medium intensity (breakpoint around 65%)

3

Recovery

70-80% max
123-139

·      Medium-High intensity (breakpoint around 75%)

4

Conditioning

80-90% max
140-157

·    High intensity

5

Overreaching

90-100% max
158-176

·     High intensity

Danger

Galloping heart

177+


 

Polar_Flow_Analyze-1_0_0To keep things simple, I mostly just look at the Polar Activity chart during the day. On “good” days, when my morning HRV reading is 8-10 on Elite HRV and 7.5 or above on HRV4Training, I go for 15 minutes of “high intensity” activity (HR above about 130). On days my HRV reading is around 6.5-7.5, I avoid high-intensity activity entirely but generally try to get in some low-medium intensity activity around Zone 2/HR 105-120. On days when my HRV says I’m overtaxed, I really try to rest as much as possible, including having my husband drop me off in front of my building at work, always taking the elevator, and going to bed an hour early.

I can’t say for certain that my rate of improvement has increased through 2018, but I can say that I am MUCH better able to handle physical activity now! in Feb. 2018, I was pleased that that my edge was to do 20 minutes of gardening on Saturday AND Sunday. In September, my edge was 3.5 hours a day of vigorous t’ai chi, on a Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday. I don’t think I’ve come close to pushing past my physical boundaries since then (3 months), though I am learning the toll stress takes on my HRV scores. But that’s another post. 🙂

 

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Adrenal Fatigue Recovery Menu

For background, see Adrenal Recovery, Pt. 1

For the week, prepare:

Breakfasts

  • Meaty:
    • 2 meatballs
    • On a sprouted bun: 2-3 oz of burger, pork tenderloin, baked turkey breast, or chicken thigh
    • Grass-fed, no-nitrate beef hot dogs (Applegate natural)
    • Salt-n-garlic beans or steamed carrot sticks as a side
  • Veggie:
    • Calabaza queso on corn tortillas
    • Raw carrot
    • Eggs are great, if you can have them
  • Avocado toast + protein

Dinners

Soup, stew, etc.

Pan dinners

Baked/Pressure/Big Batch

Super Quick

To have on hand

  • Calabaza queso, Zucchini butter, or Baba ganouj
  • Triscuits
  • Nuts/Kind bars
  • Meatballs, Grilled chicken thighs, and/or hot dogs
  • Coconut bars (omit honey but keep choc chips – 1 g sugar per serving)
  • Sweet potato wedges
  • Praeger’s veg patties (check varieties)
    • Cali burger
    • Greens burger has some potato flakes mid-way down the list; lowest carb option
    • Asian burger has some potato flakes way down the list
    • Bibimbop burger has some potato flakes way down the list; higher carb
    • Others have too much white stuff and/or egg

Freezer-stocking meals

Dining Out

  • Japanese
    • Agedashi Tofu
    • Miso
    • Edamame
    • Yakitori (sauce on side)
    • Hand rolls and brown rice on rolls
    • Chicken Terriyaki w/o sauce
  • Chinese
    • Get brown rice or don’t eat rice at restaurant
    • Moo goo gai pan
    • Hunan chicken
    • Chicken and vegetables
  • Session Room
    • Sub corn tortilla for slider bun
    • Chicken tacos
  • Qdoba
    • Burrito with brown rice
    • Tacos
  • Great Plains
    • Burger, 1/2 wheat bun, sweet potato fries
  • Noodles & Co
    • Chicken Veracruz salad
    • They don’t have ww noodles anymore, and most stuff has a lot of sugar.

Freeze-dried meal recipes

Our area sees a lot of power outages. Maybe more in another post about longer-term thoughts on dealing with them, but in this post, FOOD! During our last outage, I realized how much it mattered to be able to make a tasty, familiar meal at home. I tried a camping meal I had around, and found it to be heavy on the starch and salt and low on the…food.  Not to mention it’s hard to find many of those without dairy, eggs, or beans. But the convenience of “just add water” was undeniable, so I started experimenting with building my own vacuum-sealed, freeze-dried meals assembled out of components I bought separately. These are basically freeze-dried versions of things we eat at home – though with white rice instead of the brown we’d usually have.

So far, here are the ones that have passed muster. All recipes make a normal dinner-sized serving. That means my husband eats the whole thing in one sitting, and I eat maybe 2/3 for dinner and 1/3 of it before bed. 🙂

Freeze-dried sausage, greens, and rice

Place in a 1-quart vacuum bag (preferably the kind with a zipper), in this order:

  • 1 c. instant white rice
  • 1 Tbl. no-salt “broth powder
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 Tbl. freeze-dried onion
  • 1/2 c. freeze-dried sausage
  • 1/2 c. freeze-dried spinach

Freeze-dried salsa fry-up

Place in a 1-quart vacuum bag (preferably the kind with a zipper), in this order:

  • 1 c. instant white rice
  • 3/4 tsp. chili powder (the spice mix, not straight cayenne)
  • 1/4 tsp. cumin
  • 1/4 tsp. salt (smoked salt is great!)
  • 1 Tbl. freeze-dried onion
  • 1/2 c. freeze-dried ground beef
  • 1/2 c. freeze-dried corn
  • 1/4 c. freeze-dried spinach
  • 2 Tbl. freeze-dried bell pepper
  • 2 Tbl. freeze-dried tomato

Directions

Flatten ingredients out a bit, then seal with vacuum sealer. Mark on the bag what it is, when you sealed it, and “Add 1.5c water.” When you’re ready to eat it, boil 1.5c water, unseal the bag, pour in the water, zip it back up, smoosh the ingredients around, and put it someplace that will retain its heat (in a small cooler, in the microwave, wrapped in a towel, etc.). It will rehydrate in maybe 6-8 minutes. You might need to add a bit more water if it’s still looking dry.

Notes

  • At 2017 prices, these cost $6-7 each. About the same as Mountain House, but way less sodium and way more veg.
  • The assembly order was chosen to trap the spices within the other ingredients, or else the whoosh out of the bag when you vacuum seal it.
  • Be sure you are using freeze-dried, not just dehydrated, vegetables. Dehydrated veg really need to be simmered to cook up, and never rehydrate 100%.
  • You could probably sub chicken bouillon granules for the broth powder and salt, but I am not sure how much to use. Maybe 1 tsp?
  • “Instant” brown rice isn’t really instant – it needs to be kept boiling for nearly 10 mins. – so it won’t sub well into these recipes.
  • I think these are pretty flavorful, but YMMV.
  • I’ve been really happy with the quality of ThriveLife products. Their chicken, for example, is WAAAAAY better than Auguson Farms chicken (which tastes like cardboard to me.) Most of their items only have one ingredient – like “Green beans” or “Chicken.” You have to buy online through a local “consultant,” but shopping is easy and you  can get small or large vacuum-sealed cans. Small cans yield about 7 servings.

Vegetable quantity converter

Where has this been all my life?? If you’ve ever wondered “how many tomatoes are in a quart of chopped tomatoes?” or “how many peppers do I need to to get three cups of chopped peppers?” this site can help:

http://www.howmuchisin.com/produce_converters/

There’s also a chart from the Old Farmer’s Almanac, which also includes pound conversions: http://www.almanac.com/content/measuring-vegetables-recipes

Yay!

MOOC musings

So…if I were to teach a free online course about procuring and preparing locally-sourced foods, open to the entire world (so you’d also get to see what local food looks like in London and Delhi and Caracas), would you be interested in taking the class? It would be as much about community as the particular skills taught, and together we’d create a vast repository of local food sources, recipes, and tips.

This month’s menu

For the next 4 weeks

Week 1

• Sushi

• Salmon burgers and salad

• Out? Prep for Thurs. dinner with colleagues

• Pork loin, pasta, grilled veg

• Pizza

• Pot roast

Week 2

• Sushi

• Fried rice

• Roast chicken

• BBQ chicken, slaw, buns or cornbread

• Pizza

• Salsa fry-up

Week 3

• Sushi

• Soup and/or salad

• Beef and broccoli

• Sausage and grilled veg

• Pizza

• Chicken korma

Week 4

• Sushi

• Pasta cilantro pesto – chicken & veg

• Salmon burgers or grilled beast

• Veggie stir fry or fried rice

• Pizza

• Fajitas

Boiling water on a Hearthstone stove

20130203-191443.jpg

Usually, I can’t get water to actually boil on the stove – but I found if I stoke the fire and get a full load of wood crackling, I can actually get a full, rolling boil on the soapstone stove.

Fwiw, I’ve also found that a lot of the cooking I do doesn’t actually need boiling temps.

First Fen Snow

firstFenSnow by espring4224
firstFenSnow, a photo by espring4224 on Flickr.

This morning was the first snow we’ve seen in the new house!

Winter sunrise over the lake

Winter sunrise over the lake

Winter sunrise over the lake

What’s not working…yet

So, this passive solar home had a lot of features that were good in theory but need some changes in practice. The rock pile is the main one.

Theory: The rock pile is supposed to gather solar heat during the day and vent it into the living room (via floor vents) at night. There are also huge cold air returns to keep the air circulating. There are vents or louvers from the collector to the rock pile, and louvers on the hot ducts (but not the cold air ducts), again, to direct the flow of air.

Reality: There are several issues.

  1. All ducts blow air all the time. This is especially bad on windy days. Even the cold air “returns” have air blowing out of them into the living room. This is not so bad in the summer – sort of a natural fan, if a bit humid – but in the winter, it’s awful. Video of vent blowing air
  2. The rock pile doesn’t ever get warmer than about 65-70 degrees in the cold weather. It was about 80-85 in the summer – but you don’t want it hot then, of course. This may be because the louvers from the collector to the rocks are stuck in the “closed” position – we can’t tell until we open up the collector, and that’s not happening this year. So, we’re stuck with a 65 degree breeze, which doesn’t feel warm at all – it just feels drafty.
  3. The louvers on the hot air ducts don’t fill the entire duct space. So, if the duct coming off the rock pile is 48″ wide, the louver mechanism might only be 40″ wide, leaving a huge gap with no way to control the flow of air.
  4. There’s a large (1″) gap between the concrete slab and the wood floors. Meaning the cold air can circulate under the floor at will.
  5. Snakes really like the rock pile. And also our living room.

The workaround: For the moment, we are wedging rigid foam insulation into all the ducts to seal off the rock pile from the rest of the house, and we’ll probably spray some foam in the gaps between the ducts and the floor. Next summer, we will probably take the solar collectors apart (they need to be re-glazed desperately) and we’ll see what we can see while we’re down there. We might be able to get it functioning better, but I suspect this is one of those “better in theory than reality” items.

Fortunately, the solarium (“sunroom,” “greenhouse”) works incredibly well, building up heat during the day and releasing it to the house. For first-floor heating, we just open the French doors wide. The vents to the upstairs need some work (we need to be able to seal them tightly and open them easily), but if it’s sunny and at least 40, we don’t need any additional heat in the house during the day. If it hits 50 and is sunny during the day, we can actually go several days and nights without supplemental heat, even if it’s in the mid-20s overnight.

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